John DiJulius | Customer Experience Blog


Customer gets fined negative review; surprising landlord above & beyond; 2014 Certification

Company fines for negative online review – Social media has given consumers a megaphone to share their experience with hundreds of others. One way to avoid negative posts about your company is to improve your Customers’ experience and responsiveness when things go wrong.

If you’re not willing to do that, another option is to do what a company called KlearGear has done.  KlearGear has built in a clause in their “Terms and Conditions” at the time of sale that, if accepted, prohibits any Customer from posting anything negative about the company.

“Your acceptance of this sales contract prohibits you from taking any action that negatively impacts KlearGear.com, its reputation, products, services, management or employees.”

It appears that one Customer ordered a package but never received it. After not being able to get in touch with the company, she wrote a negative post about her experience on Ripoff Report.  Three years later she received a notice saying she had 72 hours to remove the negative review or she would be fined $3,500. KlearGear also has a clause that if you cancel your order, even for a reason like you never received it, you get charged $50.00. Check out the complete story on Hubspot.com.

Ugly Trend – I fear that more companies will adopt KlearGear’s tactic of building in a “no negative review or posting” clause in their Terms & Conditions — something no one reads or checks.  The government will have to get involved quickly or consumers will lose all power and the ability to speak up, while companies can hide behind hidden clauses.

New perspective – When you read the  definition of what a Customer Service Revolution is, one part reads, “It permeates into people’s personal lives, at home and in the community.” Here is an excellent example: I recently had a super successful Service Vision workshop with Nitel, a telecom company headquartered in Chicago. Shortly after the workshop, I received the message below from Nitel’s Director of Marketing, about how the workshop changed his approach to a personal situation.

Do you have a Certified Agent at your company this Holiday season? We are now taking applications to my next Secret Service Certification Class this March 4th & 5th in Cleveland.  As a Certified Secret Service Agent you will have the knowledge to train your company or clients in the same “Secret Service Systems” used by the top Customer service companies in the world. This class is by application only. Email your application as a PDF to David@thedijuliusgroup.com or fax back to 440-484-2373.  Limited seating. 

  

Johnism

A Customer is the most important visitor on our premises. He is not dependent on us. We are dependent on him. He is not an interruption in our work – he is the purpose of it.  We are not doing him a favor by serving him. He is doing us a favor by giving us the opportunity to serve him.

– Mahatma Gandhi

 

 

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28 Customer Service Skills learned at The Summit
2013 Secret Service Summit – Two weeks ago The DiJulius Group presented our annual Secret Service Summit, and it was clearly the best one we have done in five years. As expected, we sold out with about 450 attendees! This group of speakers was the highest rated roster we have had so far. Best of all was the energy in the room!  A world-class Customer service conference unlike any other. Everyone came to find out how to raise hospitality and Customer experience to the next level. The passion in the room was indescribable.

Let us recap some key takeaways and invaluable Customer service skills learned this year:

“Absolutely outstanding! He really drove home his message. I feel privileged to have sat in on his presentations.
Thank you.”
Key takeaways:
  • Culture – Your employee culture can’t be bluffed, bribed or bullied, but it will give you what you want; you just have to give it what it wants first. It wants context – Why are things happening? It wants predictability – What is going to happen next? It wants a positive sense of self – What is the character, the true intention and the higher purpose of the work I do and the company I do it for?
  • Leadership – Emotional commitment is what your company wants when it says it wants leadership. The key neurobiological source of emotional commitment comes from living your own deepest personal values in the relationship with your company and the environment at work.
  • Branding – Becoming a brand means transferring the sustainability of your company to your Customers, who will advertise and sell for you, and step up to protect you if you stumble or get attacked. “Branded” is a tribute, not a verb – you can’t claim it; it has to be given to you.
“I truly believe in changing the world through service, and obviously Holly does, too. I just want to give her a hug and thank her for not leaving me to feel like I am dancing alone.” 
Key takeaways:
  • Service is a Feeling. We need to pay attention to the human needs behind the business needs. The need to be truly heard, acknowledged, remembered and respected.
  • It is simple but not easy, so wearing the “turtle hat” and embodying the metaphor, reminds us to stick our necks out, have a hard shell so we don’t take things personally and be slow to respond with a negative emotional trigger.
  • Being Right Is The Booby Prize. This is the place service breaks down the fastest. If we could let go of having to be right we could actually serve people with little confrontation and upset. It doesn’t mean we don’t have guidelines; it simply makes the distinction to serve people as opposed to holding on to our righteousness
“This was my favorite presentation from both days, perhaps of the three conferences I have attended so far. This young man is so wise beyond his years and so articulate. I find him inspiring and his message very powerful.” 
Key takeaways:
  • Life doesn’t always go according to plan
  • The only disability in life is a bad attitude
  • The importance of wearing your armour of positive attitude is that it is the most powerful combatant to anything life throws at you.
“Outstanding on many points… content, delivery, ability to engage audience.
I could listen to Sasha talk for 2 days. Bring him back next year!” 
Key takeaways:
  • The New Normal has changed Customer service forever. It’s time to find new ways to relate to Customers.
  • Empathize and advocate for your Customer’s needs publicly.
  • Social media is the environment, brand content is the recipe.
“I feel very honored to have heard his presentation. Very powerful, will stay with me for the rest of my life. I will use what I learned from him in my daily life with my family, friends and co-workers.
Reon’s message is so simple, yet so incredibly profound.”
Key takeaways:
  • Having the courage to move forward in life without fear
  • The ability to truly forgive those who have wronged and/or hurt you
  • A focus perspective on what is really important in life
“Great piece to push our teams to action.
Great messages, and perfect content for the end to help deal with idea overload.” 
Key takeaways:
  • Win On The Basics. When looking for ways to differentiate our business it’s easy to get carried away with “wow” factors that we overlook the most powerful “wow” factor of all: be the best at what Customers value most. Your goal should be to be so good at the basics that you are cutting edge.
  • Create WIN/WIN Relationships. Market leaders and winning brands are those that are best at creating wins for Customers, employees, business partners, and the community. We should always strive to create wins, opportunities, and solutions for others. It is the ultimate power strategy in business and in life – be sure the other guy wins!
  • Take action. People in extraordinary companies have great ideas and take decisive action on them. People in mediocre companies have great ideas, too, but they never get past thinking about them, talking about them, and having meetings about them. Your ideas have no value until you take action. Stop thinking about it and DO it!
“So inspiring and goes to show that regardless of the business you are in, Customer service is so important and can be done. Loving the Customer RIGHT WHERE THEY ARE was an amazing message.” 
Key takeaways:
  • If you compete in an industry where world-class Customer service is not the norm, even more the reason to make it your distinct competitive advantage.
  • You can dramatically increase employees’ service aptitude and solidify their awareness to your service vision, pillars and Nevers & Always by making it fun through interactive eLearning games, i.e. Wheel of Fortune, Jeopardy, Matching.
  • Creating a world-class Customer service organization is a long-term commitment by the entire executive team and needs a dedicated champion, i.e. Customer Xperience Officer.
“John’s openings were some of the best examples I’ve seen him present.” 
 Key takeaways:
  • Companies need to systemize hospitality to make it easy for front-line employees to genuinely connect with each Customer
  • Online retail satisfaction is rising while brick & mortar is declining because retailers are failing at their biggest competitive advantage– building human relationships with the Customer standing in front of them.
  • Hire for attitude not aptitude
The 2013 Secret Service Systems Award Winner – Chick-fil-A 
The Secret Service Award recognizes Customer service excellence in three categories:
  1. Creating Secret Service Systems
  2. Creating an Experience Epiphany
  3. Revolutionizing their industry
Chick-fil-A has revolutionized the quick-service industry as well as best practices for world-class hospitality for nearly every industry. Some highlights of best practices of CFA that were recognized:
  • Their service vision – Making every guest feel cared for unlike anywhere else
  • The Core 4 – Create eye contact, share a smile, speak with enthusiasm, and stay connected
  • 2nd Mile Behaviors – Carry meals to the table for high-needs guests, clear trays from tables and refresh beverages every 15 minutes, and carry large orders to cars.
  • Their ability to get their front-line employees to be true brand evangelists.
Registration is now open to next year’s Secret Service Summit. Learn more about America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.

 2013 Secret Service Summit complete audio – Whether you were there seeing it unfold live or you were unable to get a ticket, we now have it available for you to hear and share with your entire organization. This group of speakers was the highest rated we have ever had. We captured the amazing content offered by all the brilliant leaders, authors, and motivational speakers of the 2013 Secret Service Summit Audio Series.

~John R. DiJulius III best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the President of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.

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World-Class is not prejudice | Chick-fil-A 40 years of double digit sales growth | Do your customers have permission to spend more money | 3 Must Do’s for Social Media Management Making price irrelevant…

World-Class is not only for the high-end luxury brands – Would you be surprised if I told you about an upscale restaurant that regularly has fresh flowers and fresh ground pepper at every table, meals brought while you are seated, and regular acts of kindness such as employees carrying food for women with strollers and opening doors for elderly?  What if I told you this was not an upscale restaurant, but rather a restaurant that competes in the fast food industry. Yes, I am talking about Chick-fil-A, regarded Chick-fil-A Website as one of the truly great world-class customer service anomalies, like Zappos, Southwest Airlines, and Starbucks. Chick-fil-A is truly an innovator, disrupting a stale industry (quick service restaurants) and serving as a case study business model from which any industry can learn. Chick-fil-A has more than 1,500 locations and has an unheard of 40 consecutive years of double-digit sales increase.

Mark Moraitakis Every guest feels cared for in a way that cannot be duplicatedMark G. Moraitakis is the Director of Service Innovations and a nearly 30-year veteran of Chick-fil-A. Mark is one of our amazing keynote presenters at this year’s 2011 Secret Service Summit November 3rd & 4th.  Mark will share the key reasons for Chick-fil-A’s incredible success, and how they have revolutionized the customer experience model in the quick service restaurant arena that can be applied to any business. Mark describes the purpose of CFA restaurants: to ensure every guest has an experience where they feel cared for in a way that they cannot get anywhere else.  

A WIN-WIN Customer Experience – Last week I did an Experiential Tour Workshop with a group of executives from one of my consulting clients.  We visited several customer experience revolutionary retailers from different industries, found the common themes they all share, and discussed how those themes can be applied to their business.  One common theme that reoccurred was an improved experience that greatly benefitted the customer, left them surprised and appreciative, but also greatly benefited the organization.  For instance, if Nordstrom does not have your size in a style that you want, they will order it and ship it to your house or office for no extra charge.  Wow, that means I do not have to comeback next week and pick it up! Love that! What it also means is that at other retail stores, more than half of the customers do not come back to pick up their items because it is inconvenient and they lost the urge to purchase that item a week later. This excellent customer service system also ensures Nordstrom closes more sales.  

Give your customer permission to buy more – Have you ever ordered at a drive thru only to realize that you forgot something, yet you are too afraid to add it on at the pickup window because you think it will cause mayhem to the drive thru attendant?  I personally do not want my customers to ever fear buying more.  So what if, as you pulled up to the pickup window, there were a sign that said, “Did you forget anything? You can add it on here.”   This sign would make the customer thrilled that they can still get what they wanted and the restaurant gets more sales.  Win-Win.

FREE teleseminar September 14th – The DiJulius Group is staring a monthly teleseminar series for members of the customer service revolution personally conducted by John DiJulius on how to create a world-class customer experience organization.  Find out the secrets to becoming the best in your industry, making price irrelevant to your clients and changing the world by joining the customer service revolution.  Sign up to become a member.

Quote of the week –
Your success depends on the capacity of other people to carry out your vision to the end.
Your individual effect on the outcome becomes less and less. As others, through empowerment,
take on significant responsibilities with zealous commitment, many more will enjoy success.

Receive a “Johnism” of the Day – NOW you can join me on Twitter!

~John R. DiJulius III best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the President of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.

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The Secret Weapon for driving revenue | Price or Experience Wars | Full Disclosure

“Changing the World by Creating a Customer Service Revolution…

CUSTOMER SERVICE, THE SECRET WEAPON FOR DRIVING REVENUE
– Companies spend millions creating and advertising their brands, yet the customer’s experience is what drives customer perception. A recent study reaffirmed what every customer knows, but too many leaders continue to bury their head in the sand and ignore what research shows: that a great experience not only influences where they chose to buy, but also…

  • 82% of consumers have stopped doing business with a company as a result of a negative experience
  • 55% became the customer of a company because of their reputation for great customer service
  • 40% began purchasing from a competitive brand simply because of their reputation for great customer service
  • 85% of consumers said they would be willing to pay more over the standard price in order to ensure a superior customer experience

Are you competing on price or the experience?  Consumers aren’t only demonstrating power with their wallets, but they are influencing those around them as well. Whether consumers have a positive or negative experience, their friends, family, colleagues and networks are sure to hear about it; and what they are saying carries weight. The top three factors why consumers recommend a company:

  • 55% because of its customer service
  • 49% because of the product
  • 42% because of price

Read the entire report Customer Experience Report North America 2010 – RightNow

Full Disclosure – I have been getting more and more impatient with businesses’ lack of respect for my time. I hate to be kept waiting. Recently I went to a local diner with my family for Sunday breakfast, and upon arrival the hostess warned us saying, “I apologize. We are so busy today, our kitchen is really backed up. It may take a while before you get served.”  We all responded with something along the lines of, “We are in no rush.”  The waitress eventually got us our drinks, our order and kept stopping by during our wait to refresh our drinks and apologize for the long wait. Each time we kept reassuring her that we understood. The food finally arrived and we left happy.

What was funny was afterward, when I thought about the length of time between order and delivery of the food, it was significant. However, with her being upfront and apologetic, none of us were even the slightest bit upset. It is like when you see an employee nametag that says “In Training” underneath the name. You automatically feel for this person, are more patient, understanding, and sympathetic. You want to help them out so they do not feel so overwhelmed.  Disclosing the inevitable service defect upfront is a powerful tool to getting your customers to be more understanding and patient. It is when they are not told about the delay or why or how much longer that people feel taken advantage of and are less forgiving.

Exercise of the week – A few weeks ago I shared the FORD exercise, which measures your employees’ customer intelligence.  Another great exercise is the FORD exercise for your management team, asking them to fill in the following FORD on each of their employees. How well do they know the people that report to them on a daily basis?   This will demonstrate how well they retain employee intelligence:

  • Family
  • Occupation
  • Recreation
  • Dreams

Quote of the week

 

“We are not for everyone, nor do we want to be. We are for the 1% who want to

emerge as the best of the best and are not afraid to work hard and challenge themselves

 to see how much greatness they actually have inside.”

Receive a “Johnism” of the Day – join me on http://twitter.com/johndijulius

~John DiJulius best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the CVO of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.

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Found Money | Business is Personal | Keeping the momentum | Customer Service incentive | Not making the customer wrong | Quote of the Week

“Changing the World by Creating a Customer Service Revolution…”  

A radical overthrow of conventional business mentality designed to transform what employees and customers experience.  This shift produces a culture that permeates into people’s personal lives, at home and in the community, which in turn provides the business with higher sales, morale and brand loyalty– making price irrelevant.

Found Money – Want to increase revenue without increasing advertising or labor? Customer service expert Jack Mackey proves that you can in his recent article, “Found Money: Want it or Not?” Mackey demonstrates how research has proven a staggering amount of money lost or gained per year by how well you manage your service breakdowns and your service recovering systems. I strongly encourage you to take 10 minutes and read his article to see how your company is stacking up.

Jack Mackey
Jack Mackey

All Business is Personal, it goes where it’s invited and stays where it’s appreciatedthat is Jack Mackey’s philosophy and message. Jack is one of our keynote presenters at the  2011 Secret Service Summit. As the Vice President at Service Management Group (SMG), he helps companies guide and energize their people to deliver remarkable service.  With more than 20 years of experience in customer service leadership, Jack is also co-author of The Total Customer Service System and The Manager’s Role as Coach.  He speaks on performance improvement strategies nationwide and is legendary for instilling a spirit of “celebrated discontent” in his audiences.

What gets recognized, gets repeatedOne of the best ways of keeping a World-Class customer service culture alive, without losing its momentum, is by finding ways to recognize your employees, locations or departments for delivering Above & Beyond service (Commandment VIII in What’s the Secret?) These range from soliciting, capturing and celebrating raving fans’ stories sent in from customers, to sharing them through signage, pre-shift huddles, awards, internal newsletters, and several other company communication mechanisms you use.

Excellent incentive Here is a best practice by Nestle, a consulting client of The DiJulius Group, and a company that has had their customer service management team in attendance at every annual Secret Service Summit. Nestle currently has a contest running where the employee with the best Above & Beyond story (voted on by their peers) from each of their customer service center locations wins an all expense-paid trip plus tuition to this year’s 2011 Secret Service Summit. This does several positive things: 1) It gets people to continue to think creatively to solve customer problems, 2) It generates more Above & Beyond stories so Nestle can use them to drive the awareness and service aptitude in their front lines, 3) Sometimes people who do great things, don’t do it for the recognition, and don’t bother to tell anyone what they did. A contest like this gets co-workers to tell on each other, and 4) The winners, the ones that “get it,” are rewarded by going to a two-day customer service conference with dozens of customer service experts and motivational speakers, thus giving them even more ideas and systems they can further use. Is it any wonder why Nestlé’s customer service has reached new levels over the past three years? Are there ways you can stimulate a stronger World-Class customer service culture?

Not making the customer wrongA favorite best practice I have learned from being a regular at Starbucks is how well they educate their customers in order for the customer to be able to adapt to their terminology, thus making their job more efficient. For example, if someone comes in and says, “I would like a big size, sugar-free vanilla, with non-fat milk, latte,” the Barista will confirm the order by saying something like, “certainly, you want a venti skinny vanilla latte.” This just taught the customer how to articulate their drink more quickly in Starbucks’ language, which reduces time and improves accuracy of the order. Best of all, the customer wasn’t made to feel stupid.

Quote of the week

“The biggest tragedy isn’t death — it is living without a sense purpose and a lack of passion. It is not being blind; it is having sight but no vision.”

~John DiJulius best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the CVO of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.

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IT ISN’T THEIR FAULT, THEY DON’T KNOW ANY BETTER!

I have this niece who is 20, and I have been bugging her for years to come work for me. I’ll even send her to beauty school! She is one of those bright, bubbly cute girls who lights up a room. She has a great personality and any business would love her working for them at the front lines as a receptionist, hostess, or any customer contact position.

ImageI got to see her over the holidays and asked her what she was doing. She said she has been working for a while at a Café and enjoys it.  I asked her what it was like and what her responsibilities were. As she explained them, one of the jobs the owner has given her was to make sure people who are not paying customers do not use the bathrooms.  My eyes lit up. I said, “Really?” She replied, “Yes, we even have a sign on the door that says so. Just today I saw someone who wasn’t buying anything headed to the restroom, so I ran after him and made him leave.  My owner says if they can’t pay for things, they don’t get to take advantage of our facilities because he then has to pay me to go in and clean up after them.”

I was shocked! This is my sweet adorable niece with the same family DNA. How could she think like this?  You are probably thinking how wrong I am about my niece, and that I shouldn’t want an employee like that.

Well, for starters, each of us has plenty of employees currently working for us, and I would love for her to work for me– with the proper customer service training, of course.  Her mindset is not unusual. It is more the norm.

It all goes back to Service Aptitude. No one is born with it; it is not innate. People’s Service Aptitude comes from two primary places: 1) life experiences and 2) previous work experiences.  Think about that. That’s it! No one is born with high service aptitude.  Most life experiences before the age of 25 don’t afford the know-how of what world-class service looks like.  And considering that nearly 80% of businesses out there are Average at best at customer service, that means employees have previously worked elsewhere. Not only were they not trained on what excellent service looks like, but they were poisoned with a policy-driven iron fist that teaches them that customers are out to take advantage of businesses and must be caught and stopped.

We all agree that the experiential side (how our customers are treated and cared for) is just as important as the technical/operational side of what the customer receives. However, our training contradicts that. We would never think of having an accountant, lawyer, nurse, doctor, hairdresser, or technician perform work without the proper technical training, certification, and licensing. Yet most companies have little to zero customer service certification.  To my knowledge there is no degree or even a college course that prepare our youth.

Action Plan

Don’t be discouraged.  This is the majority of our workforce. Keep reminding yourself that it is not their fault; it is our responsibility as an organization and as leaders to improve their Service Aptitude to a level that is acceptable before we allow them to interact with our customers. Make sure you re-evaluate what your soft-skill service training looks like, how well your existing and new employees know and understand your Service Vision, and how they impact it.  Be sure they know your Customer Bill of Rights, your Always & Nevers, the Secret Service Systems, what your service recovery protocols are, how they can easily go Above & Beyond, and that they have the permission and autonomy.

~John DiJulius best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the CVO of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. John DiJulius is the innovator of a methodology called Secret Service a customer service system which consistently enables organizations to deliver World-Class Customer Experiences. Find out more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, the #1 National Customer Service Conference.



ZERO RISK

You can make the argument that in business, achieving Zero Risk is as important as consistently achieving delivery of your non-negotiable service standards. Zero Risk addresses an intimidating array of issues such as service defects, lack of concern about the customer’s experience, and incidents or emergencies that aren’t a company’s fault.

“These all produce unhappy customers.”

But what does Zero Risk look like from the consumer side? As a customer, Zero Risk means you have a sense of security knowing that when you deal with a company, if something goes wrong, that company will make it right. There’s no risk (Zero Risk) on the customer’s part to deal with that company or business.

How many Zero Risk companies do you deal with? The following scenario happens every day.  You are unhappy with your experience as a customer. You express your displeasure to a front-line employee who looks at you like a deer in your headlights. At best, that employee may say “Sorry” — but that’s it. The employee isn’t allowed, or required, or trained to fix the problem. It’s obvious that nobody at the company cares whether you are disappointed, and you realize it is a waste of time and energy to try to do anything about it. So you just stop reporting your displeasure, and more importantly, you stop going back. Dealing with a company like that is High Risk and the opposite of Zero Risk.

Today, we expect very little from companies. We feel it is a waste of time to complain because companies will be defensive and will not take responsibility for the problem. By now you probably have heard the urban legend about a customer who returned tires to a Nordstrom store and Nordstrom refunded the money even though it has never sold tires. It doesn’t matter whether or not the story is true.  What does matter is that Nordstrom has an almost mythical status for its “no-hassle” customer service.

I admit that I love to shop at Nordstrom. They have made price irrelevant for me because they provide great service, and I know they are a Zero Risk company. I don’t have to worry about returning an item within 30 days or saving my receipt because Nordstrom just doesn’t haggle over these details.

I have a personal “tire experience” story with Nordstrom. One day, as I put on a nice pair of shoes, I noticed that the tongue was damaged in one of them. At first I thought nothing could be done about the situation because the shoes were nearly a year old. But then I remembered that my wife had purchased them at Nordstrom.  I decided to put Nordstrom’s reputation to the test. I took the shoes to my Nordstrom in Beachwood, Ohio, and asked for the general manager.  Fran Broda introduced herself to me as the general manager and asked how she could assist me.

“My wife purchased these shoes here nearly a year ago, and one of them is now defective.” Fran looked at the shoe. “I don’t believe Nordstrom has ever sold this brand of shoes.” I firmly disagreed.  “I am pretty confident my wife purchased these here. She buys all my shoes from Nordstrom.”

“Regardless, let me see what we can do. We should be able to repair it. Can you leave it with us for a few hours?” she replied.  I have to admit that I was a little surprised.

At first I felt that she was trying to get out of fixing the shoe. (Maybe the tire story really was a myth.) Could their customer service be overrated? I was sure I would have to pay for the repair, especially as Fran wasn’t admitting to having sold them in the first place. A few hours later, I returned to Nordstrom. The shoe was fixed and as good as new.  Better yet, to my great surprise, at no charge!

Driving home, I thought, “That was Zero Risk. They stood behind their product and fixed it, even though my shoes were nearly a year old.” I gave them a 9 on a scale of 10, losing 1 point because Fran tried to say Nordstrom’s hadn’t sold the shoes to me. When I got home, I told my wife the story. She immediately told me that Fran Broda was right! My wife remembered buying the shoes someplace else. So Nordstrom scored a perfect 10. At no charge they had repaired a used shoe that they hadn’t even sold!

“Nordstrom is truly a Zero Risk company.”

~John DiJulius best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the CVO of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. John DiJulius is the innovator of a methodology called Secret Service a customer service system which consistently enables organizations to deliver World-Class Customer Experiences. Find out more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, the #1 National Customer Service Conference.

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