John DiJulius | Customer Experience Blog


Godin on Attitude; Jeffers brings the house down; Policies that kill

Crowd Favorite – A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of being one of the keynote speakers at Anytime Fitness’s national convention. While I was a hit, the real crowd favorite was my friend, Matthew Jeffers. Watch the final seconds of Matthew’s speech and see how the 2,000 audience members react to his inspiring presentation.

 

Ryanair voted worst for Customer service in UK- Airline Ryanair has been voted as having the worst Customer service out of Britain’s 100 biggest brands. This is no real shocker considering their Director, Michael O’Leary, has been quoted calling his Customers “idiots” (see eService CEO calls Customers stupid). Companies were given a Customer satisfaction rating and judged out of five stars in three categories – knowledge, staff attitude and dealing with issues. Ryanair was rated lowest, at 54 per cent. 
 

You are what your satisfaction scores say you are – True to their form and pathetic attitude, a spokesman for the airline bragged that Ryanair responded within seven days to 99% of their Customer complaints and added, “Our Customer service statistics speak for themselves.”  Yes they do!

 

Attitude Wars – In a recent blog titled, “The Truth about the War for Talent,” Author Seth Godin writes about how HR departments like to talk about engaging in a war for talent; however, it is really about finding good enough people at an acceptable rate of pay. What I like to call reactively hiring anyone, or hiring anyone with a pulse. Godin points out it shouldn’t be a search for talent — rather a search for attitude.

 

Fight for $3 only to lose $800 – Generally employees want to do what they are taught, and many times do not do a good job of understanding when exceptions should apply.  For instance, front-line employees take the word ‘policy’ literally.  That is why I always replace it with the word ‘guideline.’ (see past eService No more policy) Here is another good (or bad) example of this happening at one of The DiJulius Group’s consulting client’s business.  A Customer came in and got over $800 in repairs on his vehicle. While the Customer waited for his vehicle to be repaired, he purchased a cup of coffee at a cafรฉ that was part of this vehicle repair shop. However, the Customer felt his coffee is was too cold and told the manager that he wanted his money back (only a few dollars).  The manager said “no” because the ‘policy’ is they don’t return half-consumed beverages. The Customer demanded his money back for his coffee, and so the manager called the police. This is for a cup of coffee that costs the business a few cents and the Customer had already spent over $800. By the way, this scenario happened before The DiJulius Group started consulting with this company.

Johnism

  

No unhappy Customer left behind

John R. DiJulius III best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the President of The DiJulius Group, the leading Customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on Customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.



Restaurants banning cell phones; TDG goes Harlem
May 10, 2013, 8:15 am
Filed under: Customer Experience, Customer Service, Harlem Shake, Policy

 

 

Restaurants banning cell phones – A popular debate among restaurateurs is the practice of banning cell phone usage. Proponents of this practice argue that cell phone conversations are distracting and annoying to the nearby Customers, and these establishments say they want to stop people from being connected from one another and bring back the good old days where family and friends actually looked at each other and had real face-to-face conversations.  I want to know your opinion on this topic, good or bad idea? Leave me a comment.

 

TDG Harlem Shake – We are not all business! Check out this hilarious 30-second video of The DiJulius Group’s Harlem Shake dance See if you can spot the one character that is in the second half of the video that is not in the first half.  Leave me a comment if you think you know who it is!

   

 

The most selfless acts are the most rewarding 

 

John R. DiJulius III best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the President of The DiJulius Group, the leading Customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on Customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.

Comments Off on Restaurants banning cell phones; TDG goes Harlem


Spend less on advertising; store charges a โ€˜just looking feeโ€™

Spend less on advertising – Research has shown that world-class Customer service organizations spend less on advertising than the rest of their industry.  Why? Because they have an unpaid sales force — their existing Customers. See: Smoking Gun blog post

 

Brand Evangelists – Carter Mario Law Firm, specializing in personal injury, has six locations throughout Connecticut and is a classic example of this theory. When Carter Mario started tracking the source of incoming calls, (the backbone of their business) in 2006 roughly 30% of their calls came from word of mouth/referral sources and the approximately 70%, came from paid advertising. By the graph below, you can see the positive growth of the law firmโ€™s word of mouth calls, (2006-2012) and last year they eclipsed 60%!

 

A world-class hospitality law firm – What changed or what was the driving force behind this movement? โ€œWhile we thought we were client centric, we realized we were relative to injury attorneys, which means we were the best of a lousy group,โ€ says Carter Mario. โ€œIn 2007 our entire organization including receptionists, in-take specialists, administrative positions, and attorneys, became obsessed with being a world-class Customer service company, benchmarked against anyone in any other industry.โ€ That they did! Carter Mario Law Firms are well known for their Customer service. I featured them in my 2nd book, Whatโ€™s the Secret?, and Carter Mario himself shared his story at our Secret Service Summit, where his company won the Secret Service System Award, presented to only one amazing Customer service organization per year.”

 

Store Charges Customers ‘Just Looking’ Fee – A store has had it with Customers walking around the store without buying anything. As a result, Redditor Barrett Fox posted a picture of a sign informing shoppers of a new โ€œjust looking feeโ€ at a specialty food store in Brisbane, Australia.  The fee is $5.00. I canโ€™t make this stuff up.  Look at the sign below.

 

Begging to go out of business – This is one of the worst policies I have ever heard of.  No business makes it very longtreating Customers like this. If people are not buying from you, you need to figure out why; is it price, product, or service? Then fix it, donโ€™t punish the Customer.   Obviously they havenโ€™t heard of the saying, โ€œDonโ€™t punish 98% of your Customers for what you are afraid of 2% might do.โ€

 

Be the Best at What Matters MostWhat if you, your team, or your entire organization had absolute clarity aboutwhat was most important, and thatโ€™s where all of your energy was focused?  Imagine the force multiplier of that kind of shared sense of direction, purpose, and priorities. My mentor, idol and friend, Joe Calloway has just released his newest book; Be the Best at What Matters Most!  Be the Best at What Matters Most reveals the one essential strategy for business leaders, entrepreneurs and those who aspire to lead.  Simplify the way you think about your business.  Success isnโ€™t about doing everything.  Itโ€™s about doing the most important things.  To get Joeโ€™s new book click here

 

Real Customer service should be called ‘custom’ service. 

 

John R. DiJulius III best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the President of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.



A company policy ends up costing a Customerโ€™s life

Company crutch – By now you know my stance on company policy. They are an old paradigm and Customer’s biggest point of frustration. Management creates policies to punish 98% of Customers for what 2% may try to get away with.

 

When company policy went too far – You are not going to believe what you are about to read.  A registered nurse from a senior living center calls 911 and tells the operator that one of their residents is lying on the ground and not breathing.  The operator dispatches an ambulance, but tells the nurse to perform CPR. The nurse says it is against company policy. The operator warns her that the person will die if she doesn’t do CPR or find someone-anyone-who will. The nurse refuses to, and just keeps saying, “I am not allowed.”  The person dies.  You have to listen to this call!  RN refuses to give CPR.

 

Who’s to blame? Would you want your loved ones living there? Employees end up using policy as a crutch, and it removes common sense and better judgment. It is not the employees’ fault; it is management’s fault for creating the policy and instilling fear in employees if they don’t follow it.

 

Airline breaks policy! This is the second eServices in a row that I am using a best practice from the airline industry. I am really not running out of material. This is just a great story.  Recently a flight arrived late, which is not uncommon. What was uncommon was what a United Airline flight attendant did.  The employee recognized a passenger visibly upset, proceeded to find out that the Customer was about to miss a connecting flight, that would have gotten him home to see his mother before she died.  The flight attendant, with the help of other employees at United, delayed that passenger’s connecting flight and the passenger was able to make the connection and see his mother in time.  Check it out: United Airlines delays flight for man to see dying mother.

 

Charitable Assumption – Companies are so worried that if they make an exception for one Customer, every Customer will expect the same thing. All the world-class Customer-service companies have zero risk policies, i.e. Nordstrom and Zappos have no return policy. Return your purchase whenever, no questions asked. The traditional management mindset protests, “They can’t do that! Customers will use their product and when they are tired of it, they will bring it back.” Nope! World-class companies have “charitable assumption,” which is trusting and giving the benefit of the doubt to their Customers.

 

Free drinks for everyone – One of the most overused Customer service examples comes from Southwest Airlines. Well, here is another one.  I recently was on a Southwest flight and the flight attendant was coming down the isle with the beverage cart.  Three rows ahead of me a woman ordered a mixed drink.  The flight attendant asked for $5.00, the Customer handed him a $5.00 bill. He says, “I am sorry, we no longer accept cash, only credit cards.” She says, “I don’t have any credit cards on me.” He replied, loud enough that I can hear him three rows back, “That’s ok, this one’s on me.”  Of course you can guess what the passenger directly behind him said, right? (“I only have cash, too!”) No! The passenger behind ordered a mixed drink as well, gave the flight attendant his credit card and said, “I will pay for her drink as well.” Could that be one of the reasons why Southwest has been the most profitable airline in the US for over 30 years?

 

 

 

Johnism

 

Your company is either creating brand evangelists,
or brand terrorists doing brand assassination.
 

 

John R. DiJulius III best-selling author, consultant, and keynote speaker, is the President of The DiJulius Group, the leading customer experience consulting firm in the nation. He blogs on customer experience trends and best practices. Learn more about The DiJulius Group or The Secret Service Summit, America’s #1 Customer Service Conference.

Comments Off on A company policy ends up costing a Customerโ€™s life



%d bloggers like this: